• This is what it took to lift me out of an autoimmune encephalitis relapse

    The plane lifts. Like many traveling for the first time since the pandemic began, anxious feelings churn beneath my calm exterior.

    Is it safe to fly? Will I regret this later?

    Bumps in the Road | Monthly Resilience Report: March 2021

    All things considered, I reaaaaaally don’t have much to complain about.

    That’s one major advantage of coming out the other side of a major medical issue as a young adult: recover, and the magnitude of most life issues dramatically diminishes compared to how you might have perceived the same life issues had you never gotten sick at all.

    Every day I’m celebratin’ 🎵 | Monthly Resilience Report: February 2021

    Have you ever tried to compress ~10 months of life into a single month’s worth of time?

    Things uh, get a little chaotic 😅

    Nothing, nothing, nothing… then BOOM! | Monthly Resilience Report: January 2021

    I can hardly fathom what a difference a month can make.

    The cognitively debilitated, anxious girl who wrote December’s monthly resilience report is closing January feeling like a markedly different person. Thanks to some milestone moments that included receiving plasmapheresis, IV steroids, and tocilizumab (Actemra)…

    End of year reflections | Monthly Resilience Report: December 2020

    I started these reports thinking that they’d be a low pressure, fun way to document progress. That by the end of 2020, they’d help me warmly reflect on how far I’ve come from my spring AE relapse.

    But the scary thing is that we’ve now arrived at the last day of the year, and the so-called “recovery” remains an elusive, faraway dream. I’m well aware that there are no guarantees when it comes to how well one recovers from AE; still, I had one promising, personal data point to draw from.  I weighted that one highest.

    Different highs, different lows | Monthly Resilience Report: November 2020

    Good news! Bad news! Good news!

    …and repeat!

    Every week brought some different health surprises, the details of which matter much less than how I’m closing out this month (more on that later). Let’s just say that when there are multiple professionals on your healthcare team, the strain in coordinating communications and getting them on the same page becomes bloated.

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